.:| ISSUE TWENTY NINE |:.

EDITORS' NOTE

                  LETISIA CRUZ &

 HEATHER LANG

 

Versions of Self

 

The hypothesis of many interacting worlds in quantum mechanics suggests:

 

  • that parallel worlds exist, and

  • that they actually interact with our world

 

Ok, so that’s weird.

 

But before you run away and completely give up on reading this editors’ note, let’s talk about something weirder.

 

It’s Friday night and you and your partner have had a rough week. You stop at the fancy gas station with the amazing craft beer selection, and you’re ready to unwind with the newest season of Daredevil. All of a sudden, your partner starts talking gibberish, saying things like “quantum mechanics is real” and asking if you’ve ever thought about your alternate reality.

 

Before you can answer, she begins describing what sounds like a very full and decidedly well thought-out alternate existence, complete with two living parents (she only has one) who live in Colorado (a place she’s never even visited) and make film cameras from vintage camera parts. The details are so precise that you have to wonder how much time she has spent in this other life. Of course, you don’t want to say it, but the word unstable comes to mind.

 

Luckily, your date switches gears rather quickly; once Daredevil comes back into focus the weirdness becomes irrelevant. But we’re all a little off, after all, aren’t we?

 

For without this small gesture / my soul seems blue

 

Welcome to ISSUE 29 of Petite Hound Press. Traditionally, Russian nesting dolls look nearly identical forcing the question—are they representations of the same soul? 

  • Facebook Classic
  • Instagram Black Square
  • Twitter Classic

 

How many nearly identical (or perhaps radically different) versions of self do we transform into within a single lifetime? In other words, how many other selves are in here? And if you believe in the possibility of the hypothesis of many interacting worlds, how many different selves are out there?

 

###

 

POET Wanda Acosta-Olmeda was born and raised in the urban areas of Newark. She spent most of her life doing what she loves best, helping others in need. She has worked for more than 18 years helping those with HIV/AIDS before assuming her current profession as a Registered Nurse. She currently draws and loves to write poetry in her spare time. She writes in both Spanish and English, and is slightly fluent in Portuguese. She utilizes poetry as a tool for guided imagery. Her method is viewed as mental therapy for her patients. Her poem, “Old Man,” came in 8th place in a school poetry contest. She lives in Bloomfield, New Jersey with her husband and daughters. 

 

PHOTOGRAPHER Michael Cassera earned a BFA in Theater Design at VPA -- Syracuse University College of Visual and Performing Arts. Today he works as the Head of Lighting with a theatre on the Las Vegas Strip, and he practices pinhole and other film photography in the Mojave Desert.

© 2015-2016 Petite Hound Press